Infotainment Factory: Australia vs Pakistan: Player ratings

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Friday, 19 October 2018

Australia vs Pakistan: Player ratings


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Australia's run of outs in Asia has continued after a 1-0 series loss to Pakistan. After a gritty draw in the first Test the side was blown away in the second, and now the verdict is in with Wide World of Sports' player ratings for the series.

Usman Khawaja – 8/10 – A man-of-the-match performance in the first Test, with scores of 85 and 141 putting to rest any doubts about his ability to play spin bowling in Asia. His match-saving second innings century was one of his finest Test knocks, although cruelly a knee injury appears set to sideline him at a time when the opportunity to lead the Australian batting had presented itself.

Aaron Finch6/10 – A solid first Test series for the 31-year-old but he will be frustrated he didn’t turn one of his starts into a really big score. Yet to eliminate the question marks about his technique against the red ball in bowler-friendly conditions, but did enough to ensure he will be there when Australia faces India in Adelaide in December.

Shaun Marsh – 1/10 – His position will come under intense scrutiny ahead of the Australian summer after a tour where he failed to fire a shot in anger. His form since the Ashes has been poor and it remains to be seen how much longer the selectors will tolerate his boom or bust returns. The team is in desperate need of his experience but it’s not out of the question the 35-year-old may have played his last Test.

Mitch Marsh – 3/10 – If his brother hadn’t had such a terrible series more of the spotlight would have fallen on Mitch’s troubles. The extra responsibility of the vice-captaincy didn’t translate into runs, and suddenly the breakout series he enjoyed with the bat against England last summer seems a million years ago. Used sparingly with the ball, it’s not a series he will look back at fondly.

Travis Head  5/10 – Showed enough in the second innings of the first Test, where his three hour vigil helped Australia secure a draw, to suggest he has the goods to succeed at this level. Like some of the players Australia introduced in the 1980s, such as Steve Waugh and David Boon, who both went on to be mainstays of the side after early struggles, selectors will need to show patience while he finds his feet.

Marnus Labuschagne – 5/10 – Picked up some handy wickets with his part-time leg-spin, but the fact remains he was chosen to score runs and on that count he failed to really deliver. His horror dismissal in the second Test where he was run out at the bowlers end through pure laziness is not a moment he will want to see replayed too often, however showed enough potential to be justify his retention for the series against India. 

Tim Paine – 7/10 – Tidy with the gloves and showed plenty of fight in the first Test, where his second innings 61* consumed 194 balls and helped secure a draw in a match Australia was entitled to lose. The mental demands of keeping wicket whilst captaining the side in such oppressive conditions can’t be underestimated and Paine did both with a minimum of fuss. However the feeling still remains that he’s very much a “caretaker” captain, yet to fully stamp his authority on the side.

Mitchell Starc – 3/10 – The warm-up game prior to the first Test was Starc’s only first-class game in six months, and the rust was evident. A hamstring complaint added to his woes, and like all the bowlers he didn’t receive any favours from Australia’s inability to bat for long periods of time in the first innings, which would have given the bowlers a break and put Pakistan under pressure on the scoreboard.

Peter Siddle – 4/10 – Toiled hard in trying conditions but the recalled veteran didn’t have any significant impact on the series. Gave his all and showed he still has plenty to offer in the Test arena when conditions suit.

Nathan Lyon – 7/10 – His stunning spell of four wickets in six balls in the second Test could have, indeed should have, turned the series in Australia’s favour, but a lack of penetration from the rest of the attack and another batting calamity meant the opportunity was squandered. Moved into fourth place on Australia’s Test wicket-taking list, and showed his usual determination with the bat in helping to save the first Test.

Jon Holland – 2/10 – Another who may have pulled on the baggy green for the last time. Not only did he struggle to take wickets, he couldn’t contain the scoring, leaking runs at nearly four per over and generally looking less effective than part-timer Marnus Labuschagne. Australian left-arm finger spinners have rarely enjoyed lengthy Test careers, and Holland will go the same way unless he can put some good numbers on the board in domestic cricket in the coming summer.

Australia's run of outs in Asia has continued after a 1-0 series loss to Pakistan. After a gritty draw in the first Test the side was blown away in the second, and now the verdict is in with Wide World of Sports' player ratings for the series.

Usman Khawaja – 8/10 – A man-of-the-match performance in the first Test, with scores of 85 and 141 putting to rest any doubts about his ability to play spin bowling in Asia. His match-saving second innings century was one of his finest Test knocks, although cruelly a knee injury appears set to sideline him at a time when the opportunity to lead the Australian batting had presented itself.

Aaron Finch6/10 – A solid first Test series for the 31-year-old but he will be frustrated he didn’t turn one of his starts into a really big score. Yet to eliminate the question marks about his technique against the red ball in bowler-friendly conditions, but did enough to ensure he will be there when Australia faces India in Adelaide in December.

Shaun Marsh – 1/10 – His position will come under intense scrutiny ahead of the Australian summer after a tour where he failed to fire a shot in anger. His form since the Ashes has been poor and it remains to be seen how much longer the selectors will tolerate his boom or bust returns. The team is in desperate need of his experience but it’s not out of the question the 35-year-old may have played his last Test.

Mitch Marsh – 3/10 – If his brother hadn’t had such a terrible series more of the spotlight would have fallen on Mitch’s troubles. The extra responsibility of the vice-captaincy didn’t translate into runs, and suddenly the breakout series he enjoyed with the bat against England last summer seems a million years ago. Used sparingly with the ball, it’s not a series he will look back at fondly.

Travis Head  5/10 – Showed enough in the second innings of the first Test, where his three hour vigil helped Australia secure a draw, to suggest he has the goods to succeed at this level. Like some of the players Australia introduced in the 1980s, such as Steve Waugh and David Boon, who both went on to be mainstays of the side after early struggles, selectors will need to show patience while he finds his feet.

Marnus Labuschagne – 5/10 – Picked up some handy wickets with his part-time leg-spin, but the fact remains he was chosen to score runs and on that count he failed to really deliver. His horror dismissal in the second Test where he was run out at the bowlers end through pure laziness is not a moment he will want to see replayed too often, however showed enough potential to be justify his retention for the series against India. 

Tim Paine – 7/10 – Tidy with the gloves and showed plenty of fight in the first Test, where his second innings 61* consumed 194 balls and helped secure a draw in a match Australia was entitled to lose. The mental demands of keeping wicket whilst captaining the side in such oppressive conditions can’t be underestimated and Paine did both with a minimum of fuss. However the feeling still remains that he’s very much a “caretaker” captain, yet to fully stamp his authority on the side.

Mitchell Starc – 3/10 – The warm-up game prior to the first Test was Starc’s only first-class game in six months, and the rust was evident. A hamstring complaint added to his woes, and like all the bowlers he didn’t receive any favours from Australia’s inability to bat for long periods of time in the first innings, which would have given the bowlers a break and put Pakistan under pressure on the scoreboard.

Peter Siddle – 4/10 – Toiled hard in trying conditions but the recalled veteran didn’t have any significant impact on the series. Gave his all and showed he still has plenty to offer in the Test arena when conditions suit.

Nathan Lyon – 7/10 – His stunning spell of four wickets in six balls in the second Test could have, indeed should have, turned the series in Australia’s favour, but a lack of penetration from the rest of the attack and another batting calamity meant the opportunity was squandered. Moved into fourth place on Australia’s Test wicket-taking list, and showed his usual determination with the bat in helping to save the first Test.

Jon Holland – 2/10 – Another who may have pulled on the baggy green for the last time. Not only did he struggle to take wickets, he couldn’t contain the scoring, leaking runs at nearly four per over and generally looking less effective than part-timer Marnus Labuschagne. Australian left-arm finger spinners have rarely enjoyed lengthy Test careers, and Holland will go the same way unless he can put some good numbers on the board in domestic cricket in the coming summer.

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