Infotainment Factory: Horn fires up at 'white-man privilege' sledge

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Thursday, 29 November 2018

Horn fires up at 'white-man privilege' sledge


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Jeff Horn has rubbished Anthony Mundine's claims that he is the recipient of 'white-man privilege', telling the 43-year-old boxing veteran to 'walk in his shoes'.

"It's not personal, he just stands for and represents everything I fight," Mundine said at Thursday's Brisbane weigh-in, where both men comfortably came in under the 71kg catchweight for Friday's fight at Suncorp Stadium.

"Injustice. He's the recipient of it. He wants to wave the flag. He wants to play the anthem ... when he doesn't understand himself."

At a press conference at Redfern last week Mundine also blasted Horn's ascendance in boxing as simply the result of his white privilege.

"He’s got that privilege. You all know what privilege I’m talking about. I’ve never had that privilege. Not many people did," Mundine said.

"I’m fighting for equality and justice. I know you want me to say it - he’s got that white-man privilege, man. He’s got that white-man privilege that allows him to have the platform he does. Look at what adversity I’ve had to go through."

Horn hit back at Mundine's claims on Thursday after a tense face-off where the pair's trash-talking almost led to blows as 'The Man' shoved Horn in the throat.

"It's been such a hard journey to get to where I am, it hasn't been easy and he talks about how easy I've got it and how easy I've had in the past to get to where I am," Horn said.

"Please walk in my shoes and then you will see how hard it has been. That is frustrating to me."

The Queenslander's camp feel Mundine, who only fought once in America in his career, is jealous of the opportunities his opponent has enjoyed.

Of all the barbs Mundine has thrown at Horn in the past few weeks, the suggestion he's had an easy ride to the top or is undeserving of his reputation is the one that has hit home.

The 30-year-old, who is taking all the risk into a fight he knows he has to win after his loss to American Terence Crawford in June, shook off Mundine's aggression.

A quick shove and some light punches to Horn's trainer Glenn Rushton's open palm and the scuffle was done. Mundine attributed his aggression to simply being ready to fight, an argument given credence by his animalistic roar after tipping the scales at 70.25kg.

Mundine stood to face a significant financial penalty if he didn't make the weight but said afterwards he's like a caged animal ready to pounce.

"I wanted to show them that not only was I gonna make the weight but I was going to make it comfortably," he said

Horn weighed in at 70.5kg, well above the welterweight marks he's had to strip weight for in the past.

The Suncorp Stadium bout is a big one for both fighters. Horn has admitted he has to win convincingly against an opponent many feel is past his best to get back into the frame for future world title bouts.

Mundine, meanwhile, is competing in what looks likely to be the last fight of his 18-year career.

"People want to see him get knocked out because of the things he says, he puts it on himself really," Horn said.

"He has been an amazing athlete, I've got to give him that. To be able to go from rugby league then to boxing, everyone wishes to do one sport living as a professional and he's done two. That's amazing."

Friday's main event is scheduled to start at approximately 2230 (AEDT) with a crowd of about 25,000 expected.

Jeff Horn has rubbished Anthony Mundine's claims that he is the recipient of 'white-man privilege', telling the 43-year-old boxing veteran to 'walk in his shoes'.

"It's not personal, he just stands for and represents everything I fight," Mundine said at Thursday's Brisbane weigh-in, where both men comfortably came in under the 71kg catchweight for Friday's fight at Suncorp Stadium.

"Injustice. He's the recipient of it. He wants to wave the flag. He wants to play the anthem ... when he doesn't understand himself."

At a press conference at Redfern last week Mundine also blasted Horn's ascendance in boxing as simply the result of his white privilege.

"He’s got that privilege. You all know what privilege I’m talking about. I’ve never had that privilege. Not many people did," Mundine said.

"I’m fighting for equality and justice. I know you want me to say it - he’s got that white-man privilege, man. He’s got that white-man privilege that allows him to have the platform he does. Look at what adversity I’ve had to go through."

Horn hit back at Mundine's claims on Thursday after a tense face-off where the pair's trash-talking almost led to blows as 'The Man' shoved Horn in the throat.

"It's been such a hard journey to get to where I am, it hasn't been easy and he talks about how easy I've got it and how easy I've had in the past to get to where I am," Horn said.

"Please walk in my shoes and then you will see how hard it has been. That is frustrating to me."

The Queenslander's camp feel Mundine, who only fought once in America in his career, is jealous of the opportunities his opponent has enjoyed.

Of all the barbs Mundine has thrown at Horn in the past few weeks, the suggestion he's had an easy ride to the top or is undeserving of his reputation is the one that has hit home.

The 30-year-old, who is taking all the risk into a fight he knows he has to win after his loss to American Terence Crawford in June, shook off Mundine's aggression.

A quick shove and some light punches to Horn's trainer Glenn Rushton's open palm and the scuffle was done. Mundine attributed his aggression to simply being ready to fight, an argument given credence by his animalistic roar after tipping the scales at 70.25kg.

Mundine stood to face a significant financial penalty if he didn't make the weight but said afterwards he's like a caged animal ready to pounce.

"I wanted to show them that not only was I gonna make the weight but I was going to make it comfortably," he said

Horn weighed in at 70.5kg, well above the welterweight marks he's had to strip weight for in the past.

The Suncorp Stadium bout is a big one for both fighters. Horn has admitted he has to win convincingly against an opponent many feel is past his best to get back into the frame for future world title bouts.

Mundine, meanwhile, is competing in what looks likely to be the last fight of his 18-year career.

"People want to see him get knocked out because of the things he says, he puts it on himself really," Horn said.

"He has been an amazing athlete, I've got to give him that. To be able to go from rugby league then to boxing, everyone wishes to do one sport living as a professional and he's done two. That's amazing."

Friday's main event is scheduled to start at approximately 2230 (AEDT) with a crowd of about 25,000 expected.

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