Infotainment Factory: Aussie Test batting 'third-worst in the last 100 years'

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Sunday, 30 December 2018

Aussie Test batting 'third-worst in the last 100 years'


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In the Test series against India, Australia's new-look batting lineup have rightly endured the bulk of criticism for their uninspiring display in three matches.

Recent squad changes, and the addition of fresh blood have failed to fix the runs drought since the turmoil of the ball tampering saga in March, much to the frustration of new skipper Tim Paine and Australian selectors.

Of the many stats which have highlighted the current demise of Australian Test batting, this one is among the more dire.

In 2018, Australia averaged 26.03 runs per wicket in Test matches, which was the third-worst in the last 100 years.

Here's the company the 2018 Test side has joined after the third Test ended a forgettable year.

1956 - 21.58 runs per wicket

1978 - 25.35 runs per wicket

2018 - 26.03 runs per wicket

1970 - 26.21 runs per wicket

The 1978 Test side was a weakened Australian side due to World Series Cricket, but the current side barely improved their mark.

More worrying still is there's no real obvious selection solution in sight, ensuring the squad tinkering will continue until there are more encouraging results.

India takes 2-1 series lead

India are confident and far from complacent after defeating Australia by 137 runs in the third Test.

They will take a 2-1 series lead to the SCG, where the final Test starts on Thursday.

India have failed to win 11 previous Test series in Australia, a barren stretch dating back to when they were crushed by Don Bradman's side in 1948.

But the tourists, having exposed Australia's batting woes in clinical fashion throughout the MCG match, now have all the momentum.

Aaron Finch

Paine, who admitted changes to the batting order and XI were possible after the lopsided loss, insisted his top six could find form and level the series in Sydney.

"We were outplayed and India deserved to win this Test," Paine said.

"It's inexperience. It's pressure. It's India's bowling attack being probably as good as probably most of these guys have ever faced.

"We're under no illusions we've got to work really hard."

- with AAP

In the Test series against India, Australia's new-look batting lineup have rightly endured the bulk of criticism for their uninspiring display in three matches.

Recent squad changes, and the addition of fresh blood have failed to fix the runs drought since the turmoil of the ball tampering saga in March, much to the frustration of new skipper Tim Paine and Australian selectors.

Of the many stats which have highlighted the current demise of Australian Test batting, this one is among the more dire.

In 2018, Australia averaged 26.03 runs per wicket in Test matches, which was the third-worst in the last 100 years.

Here's the company the 2018 Test side has joined after the third Test ended a forgettable year.

1956 - 21.58 runs per wicket

1978 - 25.35 runs per wicket

2018 - 26.03 runs per wicket

1970 - 26.21 runs per wicket

The 1978 Test side was a weakened Australian side due to World Series Cricket, but the current side barely improved their mark.

More worrying still is there's no real obvious selection solution in sight, ensuring the squad tinkering will continue until there are more encouraging results.

India takes 2-1 series lead

India are confident and far from complacent after defeating Australia by 137 runs in the third Test.

They will take a 2-1 series lead to the SCG, where the final Test starts on Thursday.

India have failed to win 11 previous Test series in Australia, a barren stretch dating back to when they were crushed by Don Bradman's side in 1948.

But the tourists, having exposed Australia's batting woes in clinical fashion throughout the MCG match, now have all the momentum.

Aaron Finch

Paine, who admitted changes to the batting order and XI were possible after the lopsided loss, insisted his top six could find form and level the series in Sydney.

"We were outplayed and India deserved to win this Test," Paine said.

"It's inexperience. It's pressure. It's India's bowling attack being probably as good as probably most of these guys have ever faced.

"We're under no illusions we've got to work really hard."

- with AAP

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