Infotainment Factory: Lehmann reflects on Cape Town one year on

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Monday, 25 March 2019

Lehmann reflects on Cape Town one year on


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Former Australian coach Darren Lehmann has opened up on the infamous ball tampering saga a year after the incident took place.

Speaking on Macquarie Sports Radio, Lehmann urged the Australian public to support Steve Smith and David Warner as they near their returns to the Australian team.

"They’re good young men, everyone’s entitled to make a mistake and they’ve learned from that," Lehmann said.

"I think everyone’s moved on and we need to as well. Warner and Smith, they will play and they will be in the starting XI in the World Cup.

Darren Lehmann

"They are two world class players. I imagine (Warner) will open with Finch and Smith will bat three or four."

Looking back at the incident that took place in Cape Town, Lehmann admitted that he did feel he was responsible for the players' actions.

"Your responsibility (as coach) is to try and win the game, not in that particular way, but you’re still in charge of a group of men and staff so that’s part of the reason I stood down to be honest," he said.

"It was about moving on and letting the game of cricket get back to where it should be.

"As a coach you do take responsibility for that because you are trying to win and we crossed the line on that particular day."

Lehmann admitted that in hindsight after the incident he had understood that he had coached too long and had fallen out of love with the game.

"It’s about the game, the three guys and the people that left the game, the game is bigger than that," he said.

"One of the things I have fallen in love with again is the game. You’re away 300 days a year as a coach and I think I coached too long to be honest."

Following the tampering scandal and the resultant review into Cricket Australia's culture, it was suggested by many that the pressure from CA to win at all costs may have had an indirect impact on Smith, Warner and Bancroft's actions.

However, Lehmann admitted that the pressure to win from CA was no different to pressure from any sporting body for aprofessional side to produce results.

Lehmann also added that he has been in constant contact with the tampering trio and wished them well on their returns.

"I speak to them quite regularly," he said.

"They’re looking forward to getting back and playing with their mates.

"Those three boys, I just hope they play really well when they play for Australia again."

Former Australian coach Darren Lehmann has opened up on the infamous ball tampering saga a year after the incident took place.

Speaking on Macquarie Sports Radio, Lehmann urged the Australian public to support Steve Smith and David Warner as they near their returns to the Australian team.

"They’re good young men, everyone’s entitled to make a mistake and they’ve learned from that," Lehmann said.

"I think everyone’s moved on and we need to as well. Warner and Smith, they will play and they will be in the starting XI in the World Cup.

Darren Lehmann

"They are two world class players. I imagine (Warner) will open with Finch and Smith will bat three or four."

Looking back at the incident that took place in Cape Town, Lehmann admitted that he did feel he was responsible for the players' actions.

"Your responsibility (as coach) is to try and win the game, not in that particular way, but you’re still in charge of a group of men and staff so that’s part of the reason I stood down to be honest," he said.

"It was about moving on and letting the game of cricket get back to where it should be.

"As a coach you do take responsibility for that because you are trying to win and we crossed the line on that particular day."

Lehmann admitted that in hindsight after the incident he had understood that he had coached too long and had fallen out of love with the game.

"It’s about the game, the three guys and the people that left the game, the game is bigger than that," he said.

"One of the things I have fallen in love with again is the game. You’re away 300 days a year as a coach and I think I coached too long to be honest."

Following the tampering scandal and the resultant review into Cricket Australia's culture, it was suggested by many that the pressure from CA to win at all costs may have had an indirect impact on Smith, Warner and Bancroft's actions.

However, Lehmann admitted that the pressure to win from CA was no different to pressure from any sporting body for aprofessional side to produce results.

Lehmann also added that he has been in constant contact with the tampering trio and wished them well on their returns.

"I speak to them quite regularly," he said.

"They’re looking forward to getting back and playing with their mates.

"Those three boys, I just hope they play really well when they play for Australia again."

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