Infotainment Factory: Greenberg defends controversial 'no fault' rule

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Tuesday, 16 April 2019

Greenberg defends controversial 'no fault' rule


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NRL CEO Todd Greenberg has defended the league's controversial "no fault" stand down rule while admitting that there was no evidence that the rule would curb off-field scandals.

Greenberg took the stand in court on Tuesday after Dragons lock forward Jack de Belin sued the league for being stood down as a result of the rule prior to the 2019 season.

The league boss told the court he brought the rule into place to give the public the perception the league was serious about addressing the ongoing off-field issues of player misconduct.

“It was urgent for us to get that rule in place before the start of the season,” he said while giving evidence.

Jack de Belin

"The game's got to defend it's position. Based on the numerous issues we were dealing with in relation to player misconduct, it was urgent for us.

"It creates untold headlines and very significant damage to the brand. I ultimately wrote our own rule for our own use."

Under the "no fault" rules, the game can stand down any player charged with a serious crime which carries a jail term of 11 years or more.

De Belin was stood down indefinitely after he was charged with the aggravated sexual assault of a 19-year-old woman in a Wollongong apartment.

He has pleaded not guilty and the case is scheduled to be mentioned in Wollongong Local Court on Wednesday.

- With AAP

NRL CEO Todd Greenberg has defended the league's controversial "no fault" stand down rule while admitting that there was no evidence that the rule would curb off-field scandals.

Greenberg took the stand in court on Tuesday after Dragons lock forward Jack de Belin sued the league for being stood down as a result of the rule prior to the 2019 season.

The league boss told the court he brought the rule into place to give the public the perception the league was serious about addressing the ongoing off-field issues of player misconduct.

“It was urgent for us to get that rule in place before the start of the season,” he said while giving evidence.

Jack de Belin

"The game's got to defend it's position. Based on the numerous issues we were dealing with in relation to player misconduct, it was urgent for us.

"It creates untold headlines and very significant damage to the brand. I ultimately wrote our own rule for our own use."

Under the "no fault" rules, the game can stand down any player charged with a serious crime which carries a jail term of 11 years or more.

De Belin was stood down indefinitely after he was charged with the aggravated sexual assault of a 19-year-old woman in a Wollongong apartment.

He has pleaded not guilty and the case is scheduled to be mentioned in Wollongong Local Court on Wednesday.

- With AAP

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