Infotainment Factory: ‘Hungover horror show’: England players savaged

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Wednesday, 24 July 2019

‘Hungover horror show’: England players savaged


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It was the “horror show” that saw England dismissed for just 85 on the opening day of their one-off Test against Ireland at Lord’s.

What was supposed to be a gentle Ashes tune-up against a cricketing minnow turned into embarrassment for the home side, who were bundled out in just 23.4 overs.

Journeyman Tim Murtagh, who turns 38 next week, was the star, claiming 5-13 off nine overs of accurate medium pace.

Predictably, the English media was quick to turn on the World Cup champions, with many questioning how they will perform against the likes of Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins, when the Ashes start next week.

Jonny Bairstow is bowled by Tim Murtagh on the first day of the Test at Lord's.

Former England opening batsman Geoffrey Boycott pulled no punches in the Telegraph, writing that “three of our best World Cup batsmen were still in one-day mode,” and that debutant Jason Roy needs to do some “serious thinking” if he wants to transfer his white-ball success into the longer form of the game.

Boycott was also less than complimentary about Roy’s opening partner Rory Burns, writing that he’s “never been convinced” about the 28-year-old.

“It’s rumoured that the England hierarchy like him because he’s gutsy and a fighter,” Boycott wrote.

“Stickability is an admirable quality but alone can’t make up for a lack of ability.”

The Sun ran the headline “World Cup champs to village chumps,” with columnist Dave Kidd referring to England’s “historic humiliation.”

“It was a comprehensive rout with a succession of top-order batsmen befuddled by slow-coach (Tim) Murtagh, little-known Mark Adair and big Boyd Rankin, who once played a Test for England during an Ashes whitewash Down Under,” he wrote.

England's captain Joe Root has been left with a host of worries a week out from the Ashes.

Kidd raised the perfectly valid point that the day’s play leaves question marks over England’s Ashes preparations.

“England have no discernible top three, no international-class spinner and no idea which seam bowlers will be fit, with Jimmy Anderson and Jofra Archer nursing niggles.

“While Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler were allowed to sit out, those who did lift that World Cup trophy — (Jason) Roy, Joe Root, Jonny Bairstow, Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes — looked thoroughly hungover.”

In the Guardian, former England spinner Vic Marks wrote that the day’s play was “just as staggering as the conclusion of the World Cup at the same ground 10 days ago,” while the Australian players, engaged in an intra-squad match in Southampton, “may have stopped snarling at one another for a while to embark on a group guffaw.”

Marks wrote that “England’s batting displayed all the solidity of a blancmange,” and the team “will have to play well to get out of this mess.”

Under a headline describing England’s batting effort as “pathetic,” Paul Newman in the Daily Mail wrote that “England were comatose from the moment Roy endured a miserable debut,” slamming the selectors for putting an “unbalanced hotch-potch of a team” on the field.

Dean Wilson in the Mirror was one of many to highlight the fact that England have now lost 10 wickets in a session four times in their last 34 Tests.

https://twitter.com/MichaelVaughan/status/1153985097328144384?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

“This was yet ­another miserable ­performance with the bat from a team who are familiar with the art of the collapse,” wrote Wilson.

“The basics that their batsmen get so right in one-day cricket are ­repeatedly found lacking in Test cricket – and they were exposed in the most brutal fashion.

“The search for a top three that can withstand the pressures of Test cricket will have to continue.

“Rory Burns, Jason Roy and Joe Denly will almost certainly be the top three at Edgbaston against Australia next week, but couldn’t deal with ­accuracy and movement early on, nor could Root or Jonny Bairstow.”

Former England captain Michael Vaughan was in fine form on Twitter as always, at one point tweeting a simple “WTF” as the home side capitulated, although he did find time to see the lighter side of things, pointing out that 85 is England’s highest ever Test score against Ireland.

https://twitter.com/derekpringle/status/1154001275576639492?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Vaughan also noted that “all the England World Cup winners should have been rested for this Test. Emotionally near on impossible to get themselves up for this game.”

Former England seamer Derek Pringle tweeted that it was “a horror show from England’s batsmen” and to be dismissed before lunch was “beyond woeful.”

At least the calamity at Lord’s diverted England’s attention from the massacre happening down the road at Southampton, where 32 Australian wickets have fallen in two days of their intra-squad match.

On the evidence of the last couple of days, only the very optimistic would buy tickets for day five of an Ashes Test.

The Ashes will be live on Nine from August 1.

It was the “horror show” that saw England dismissed for just 85 on the opening day of their one-off Test against Ireland at Lord’s.

What was supposed to be a gentle Ashes tune-up against a cricketing minnow turned into embarrassment for the home side, who were bundled out in just 23.4 overs.

Journeyman Tim Murtagh, who turns 38 next week, was the star, claiming 5-13 off nine overs of accurate medium pace.

Predictably, the English media was quick to turn on the World Cup champions, with many questioning how they will perform against the likes of Mitchell Starc and Pat Cummins, when the Ashes start next week.

Jonny Bairstow is bowled by Tim Murtagh on the first day of the Test at Lord's.

Former England opening batsman Geoffrey Boycott pulled no punches in the Telegraph, writing that “three of our best World Cup batsmen were still in one-day mode,” and that debutant Jason Roy needs to do some “serious thinking” if he wants to transfer his white-ball success into the longer form of the game.

Boycott was also less than complimentary about Roy’s opening partner Rory Burns, writing that he’s “never been convinced” about the 28-year-old.

“It’s rumoured that the England hierarchy like him because he’s gutsy and a fighter,” Boycott wrote.

“Stickability is an admirable quality but alone can’t make up for a lack of ability.”

The Sun ran the headline “World Cup champs to village chumps,” with columnist Dave Kidd referring to England’s “historic humiliation.”

“It was a comprehensive rout with a succession of top-order batsmen befuddled by slow-coach (Tim) Murtagh, little-known Mark Adair and big Boyd Rankin, who once played a Test for England during an Ashes whitewash Down Under,” he wrote.

England's captain Joe Root has been left with a host of worries a week out from the Ashes.

Kidd raised the perfectly valid point that the day’s play leaves question marks over England’s Ashes preparations.

“England have no discernible top three, no international-class spinner and no idea which seam bowlers will be fit, with Jimmy Anderson and Jofra Archer nursing niggles.

“While Ben Stokes and Jos Buttler were allowed to sit out, those who did lift that World Cup trophy — (Jason) Roy, Joe Root, Jonny Bairstow, Moeen Ali and Chris Woakes — looked thoroughly hungover.”

In the Guardian, former England spinner Vic Marks wrote that the day’s play was “just as staggering as the conclusion of the World Cup at the same ground 10 days ago,” while the Australian players, engaged in an intra-squad match in Southampton, “may have stopped snarling at one another for a while to embark on a group guffaw.”

Marks wrote that “England’s batting displayed all the solidity of a blancmange,” and the team “will have to play well to get out of this mess.”

Under a headline describing England’s batting effort as “pathetic,” Paul Newman in the Daily Mail wrote that “England were comatose from the moment Roy endured a miserable debut,” slamming the selectors for putting an “unbalanced hotch-potch of a team” on the field.

Dean Wilson in the Mirror was one of many to highlight the fact that England have now lost 10 wickets in a session four times in their last 34 Tests.

https://twitter.com/MichaelVaughan/status/1153985097328144384?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

“This was yet ­another miserable ­performance with the bat from a team who are familiar with the art of the collapse,” wrote Wilson.

“The basics that their batsmen get so right in one-day cricket are ­repeatedly found lacking in Test cricket – and they were exposed in the most brutal fashion.

“The search for a top three that can withstand the pressures of Test cricket will have to continue.

“Rory Burns, Jason Roy and Joe Denly will almost certainly be the top three at Edgbaston against Australia next week, but couldn’t deal with ­accuracy and movement early on, nor could Root or Jonny Bairstow.”

Former England captain Michael Vaughan was in fine form on Twitter as always, at one point tweeting a simple “WTF” as the home side capitulated, although he did find time to see the lighter side of things, pointing out that 85 is England’s highest ever Test score against Ireland.

https://twitter.com/derekpringle/status/1154001275576639492?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Vaughan also noted that “all the England World Cup winners should have been rested for this Test. Emotionally near on impossible to get themselves up for this game.”

Former England seamer Derek Pringle tweeted that it was “a horror show from England’s batsmen” and to be dismissed before lunch was “beyond woeful.”

At least the calamity at Lord’s diverted England’s attention from the massacre happening down the road at Southampton, where 32 Australian wickets have fallen in two days of their intra-squad match.

On the evidence of the last couple of days, only the very optimistic would buy tickets for day five of an Ashes Test.

The Ashes will be live on Nine from August 1.

https://ift.tt/2Yn1DOy
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