live Infotainment Factory: Cummins pinpoints failure from Ashes boilover

Trending

>

Post Top Ad

Post Top Ad

Tuesday, 27 August 2019

Cummins pinpoints failure from Ashes boilover


//

It was the relative calm before the storm for Australia's attack at Headingley but their struggles with the second new ball will be a big focus heading into the fourth Test at Old Trafford, where Pat Cummins expects to back up.

Ben Stokes' six-laden rampage, and Australia's various missed chances, grabbed all the headlines as England snatched an astonishing one-wicket win to level the series at 1-1.

However, it was Stokes and Jonny Bairstow's counter-punching stand of 86 runs that gave their team genuine belief of completing England's highest chase in Test history.

The hosts were 4-159 when Nathan Lyon had Joe Root out edging on day four, still 200 runs short of their target.

Tim Paine had no hesitation taking the second new ball soon after but it proved more hindrance than help, rocketing off the bat as Stokes and Bairstow attacked anything loose.

Australia's quicks struggled with their line and length when confronted with the aggression.

"One thing we spoke about was with the new ball, obviously you feel like you're more in the game," Cummins said after Australia debriefed in Leeds.

"But that wicket almost felt like a one-day wicket or an Indian wicket, where with the new ball it's a double-edged sword.

"If you're not absolutely perfect you can go for runs and I think if we reflect on that half and hour, they might have got 30 or 40 runs pretty quickly ... we'll have a look at that.

"Other than that I thought we were brilliant."

Coach Justin Langer was full of praise for his fast bowlers but agreed there was an obvious area for improvement.

"When the new ball came, which probably surprised a few people, we maybe tried a little bit too hard," Langer said.

"Bowled a little bit too short."

Cummins has endured a bigger workload than any other bowler in the touring party.

The vice-captain is the only Australian paceman to play all three Tests, while he has been in England since arriving for the World Cup in May.

Cummins will skip the three-day tour game in Derby that starts on Thursday but is adamant he can play the final two Tests as Australia pursue their first Ashes series win in England since 2001.

"I'm feeling really good," Cummins said.

"If you'd asked me that a few months ago - after the World Cup and three Tests, I would have thought I'd be a bit more tired and run down.

"Have a bit of a break after this and be right for Manchester then see how we go."

It was the relative calm before the storm for Australia's attack at Headingley but their struggles with the second new ball will be a big focus heading into the fourth Test at Old Trafford, where Pat Cummins expects to back up.

Ben Stokes' six-laden rampage, and Australia's various missed chances, grabbed all the headlines as England snatched an astonishing one-wicket win to level the series at 1-1.

However, it was Stokes and Jonny Bairstow's counter-punching stand of 86 runs that gave their team genuine belief of completing England's highest chase in Test history.

The hosts were 4-159 when Nathan Lyon had Joe Root out edging on day four, still 200 runs short of their target.

Tim Paine had no hesitation taking the second new ball soon after but it proved more hindrance than help, rocketing off the bat as Stokes and Bairstow attacked anything loose.

Australia's quicks struggled with their line and length when confronted with the aggression.

"One thing we spoke about was with the new ball, obviously you feel like you're more in the game," Cummins said after Australia debriefed in Leeds.

"But that wicket almost felt like a one-day wicket or an Indian wicket, where with the new ball it's a double-edged sword.

"If you're not absolutely perfect you can go for runs and I think if we reflect on that half and hour, they might have got 30 or 40 runs pretty quickly ... we'll have a look at that.

"Other than that I thought we were brilliant."

Coach Justin Langer was full of praise for his fast bowlers but agreed there was an obvious area for improvement.

"When the new ball came, which probably surprised a few people, we maybe tried a little bit too hard," Langer said.

"Bowled a little bit too short."

Cummins has endured a bigger workload than any other bowler in the touring party.

The vice-captain is the only Australian paceman to play all three Tests, while he has been in England since arriving for the World Cup in May.

Cummins will skip the three-day tour game in Derby that starts on Thursday but is adamant he can play the final two Tests as Australia pursue their first Ashes series win in England since 2001.

"I'm feeling really good," Cummins said.

"If you'd asked me that a few months ago - after the World Cup and three Tests, I would have thought I'd be a bit more tired and run down.

"Have a bit of a break after this and be right for Manchester then see how we go."

https://ift.tt/2HunN7Q
//

No comments:

Post a Comment