live Infotainment Factory: Kyrgios' unspoken power against suspension

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Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Kyrgios' unspoken power against suspension


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Leading tennis commentator Sam Groth says he doesn't expect Nick Kyrgios to be suspended for the Australian summer, despite the controversial star's latest outburst.

Kyrgios created headlines after his opening round match at the US Open, when he called the ATP "corrupt" after being asked about his record $167,000 fine imposed after a meltdown in Cincinnati.

The 24-year-old has since backtracked, posting on social media that "it was not the correct choice of words" and noting that he intended "to address what I see as double standards rather than corruption."

The ATP has launched an investigation into Kyrgios' latest drama, with the incident to be assessed under the body's "Player Major Offence" provision.

Having already levied a record fine, many believe a suspension is on the cards for the Australian.

But Groth doesn't believe Kyrgios will be rubbed out for the Australian summer.

"No. I wouldn't think so," Groth told Wide World of Sports.

"The behaviour, you can't agree with. Nobody could look at it and say that it was OK. But at the same time, you're talking about the Australian summer.

"You've got the number one Australian male player, who fills Melbourne Park every time he plays with people who are not just corporate ticket holders. Maybe he doesn't cater to that group of people, but you feel like he's the people's player.

"They're starting up the new event – the ATP Cup – in January. Are you going to have the home country's number one player suspended for that? I wouldn't think so.

"He might say money doesn't matter but anyone who cops a six figure fine definitely feels it."

Regardless of the punishment handed down to the world No.30, Groth believes Kyrgios needs to learn from the drama.

"I think it was a stupid thing to say at two o'clock in the morning," Groth said.

"Obviously you come off a match and it's late, he obviously felt that he was hard done by, maybe because of the fines he's copped in recent times and that sort of stuff.

"He's backtracking now with his statement on social media, but I think if he had his time again he probably wouldn't have said it.

Nick Kyrgios is unlikely to be suspended for the Australian summer, according to Sam Groth.

"He's got to get a bit better at managing his words and emotions, not just off the court, but on the court as well. I'm a big supporter of Nick's, but you've got to be so careful with what you say."

The unknown at this time is what conversations, if any, have taken place behind closed doors between Kyrgios and representatives of the ATP.

According to an ESPN report, prior to 2016 the ATP automatically banned players for eight weeks if they were fined more than $10,000 twice in a 12-month period.

It's a measure Groth believes the ATP would need to be cautious about revisiting.

"I think it's hard. Obviously the tour governs itself, but it's made up of representatives of the players and the tournaments, so you're not a direct employee of the ATP, you're actually one of the owners," Groth said.

"In saying that, you've got to keep the reputation of the tour intact. But the tournaments will think that if they've got a player coming to their event, and it's their big drawcard, and that player is suspended because of a fine he received elsewhere, they're not going to be happy.

"It's all well and good to float the idea, but you'd have to look at it a bit closer to figure out the full ramifications."

Leading tennis commentator Sam Groth says he doesn't expect Nick Kyrgios to be suspended for the Australian summer, despite the controversial star's latest outburst.

Kyrgios created headlines after his opening round match at the US Open, when he called the ATP "corrupt" after being asked about his record $167,000 fine imposed after a meltdown in Cincinnati.

The 24-year-old has since backtracked, posting on social media that "it was not the correct choice of words" and noting that he intended "to address what I see as double standards rather than corruption."

The ATP has launched an investigation into Kyrgios' latest drama, with the incident to be assessed under the body's "Player Major Offence" provision.

Having already levied a record fine, many believe a suspension is on the cards for the Australian.

But Groth doesn't believe Kyrgios will be rubbed out for the Australian summer.

"No. I wouldn't think so," Groth told Wide World of Sports.

"The behaviour, you can't agree with. Nobody could look at it and say that it was OK. But at the same time, you're talking about the Australian summer.

"You've got the number one Australian male player, who fills Melbourne Park every time he plays with people who are not just corporate ticket holders. Maybe he doesn't cater to that group of people, but you feel like he's the people's player.

"They're starting up the new event – the ATP Cup – in January. Are you going to have the home country's number one player suspended for that? I wouldn't think so.

"He might say money doesn't matter but anyone who cops a six figure fine definitely feels it."

Regardless of the punishment handed down to the world No.30, Groth believes Kyrgios needs to learn from the drama.

"I think it was a stupid thing to say at two o'clock in the morning," Groth said.

"Obviously you come off a match and it's late, he obviously felt that he was hard done by, maybe because of the fines he's copped in recent times and that sort of stuff.

"He's backtracking now with his statement on social media, but I think if he had his time again he probably wouldn't have said it.

Nick Kyrgios is unlikely to be suspended for the Australian summer, according to Sam Groth.

"He's got to get a bit better at managing his words and emotions, not just off the court, but on the court as well. I'm a big supporter of Nick's, but you've got to be so careful with what you say."

The unknown at this time is what conversations, if any, have taken place behind closed doors between Kyrgios and representatives of the ATP.

According to an ESPN report, prior to 2016 the ATP automatically banned players for eight weeks if they were fined more than $10,000 twice in a 12-month period.

It's a measure Groth believes the ATP would need to be cautious about revisiting.

"I think it's hard. Obviously the tour governs itself, but it's made up of representatives of the players and the tournaments, so you're not a direct employee of the ATP, you're actually one of the owners," Groth said.

"In saying that, you've got to keep the reputation of the tour intact. But the tournaments will think that if they've got a player coming to their event, and it's their big drawcard, and that player is suspended because of a fine he received elsewhere, they're not going to be happy.

"It's all well and good to float the idea, but you'd have to look at it a bit closer to figure out the full ramifications."

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